Sunday, 2 December 2018

Soshanguve Township, South Africa, Christmas gift giving.

We lived in South Africa January 2011 till December 2014, since then I've returned many times to continue supporting a Christmas Charity with collecting and distributing Christmas gifts to children living in poverty in townships in and around Pretoria. There's so much more to just packing a box, it involves work all year round, from visiting facilities in rural townships, to collecting names, uploading information on the website, through to asking for individual donations as well as obtaining bulk donations, collecting, sorting and delivering the gifts to the children often in locations with no phone signal or GPS location.

A friend and I did 3 celebrations on Sunday, 200+ children. 2 facilities were new to us and took some finding, driving off road and round in circles, mindful of our personal safety. We arrived at the facilities to discover they'd enrolled extra children and we had to make magic boxes from our collection of extras in the car boot to ensure every child received a gift.

It's very emotional, it's hot and hard work (temps 35c) no running water, a long drop only to pee in and trust me, you really have to be desperate to use one. 


These are the children's bathrooms.


It's very rewarding though and we get to meet the most amazing and selfless people who support orphans and the most vulnerable children in society, often with no government funding. 

By bringing a child in their care a Christmas Gift we are supporting the supporters, what we do is very little in comparison to their day to day struggles.

For reasons of child protection I am unable to post pictures of the children.




Car loaded and off. Only in South Africa can packets of sanitary pads cause much excitement for young girls.

This is the home for one young boy. He lives with his sister who has a small baby and their disabled grandmother in one room, this is their kitchen where they cook on a make shift fire.

One fo the care providers receiving a box on behalf of a child. Of the 7000+ boxes collected when I was here in September/October, I was surprised to discover 2 boxes I'd personally packed from friends in the UK.




Musings Of A Tired Mummy

14 comments:

  1. This is the other side of Christmas. What a selfless job. thank goodness for the people who help in this way.

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    1. thank you, it is such an extreme from life in Dubai

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  2. Amazing work is put in by the team to provide for others, every time I see you doing this I admire you and what you put in.

    Thank you for linking up to #MySundayPhoto

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  3. I salute you for what you are doing. The world is a better place because of people like you.
    God Bless!

    #GlobalBlogging

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  4. What an amazing thing to do! I've really wanted to volunteer at a soup kitchen on Christmas Day for the last few years but as I've been pregnant; I've wanted to avoid any potential harm. I think when the boys are a few years older it would be lovely to do it and they can spend the time with their family until they get to an age where they can come with and help out too! Thank you for sharing this with us at #TriumphantTales. I hope to see you back next week!

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    1. I'm not sure what potential harm you could happen from volunteering in a soup kitchen whilst pregnant, my friend brought her 3 month old baby into the township this week to help out

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  5. This is the side of Christmas we are keen for our kids to really embrace - a season of giving as much as receiving, especially for those who do not enjoy the same luxuries as us.

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  6. What an amazing thing to do. It's incredible what sort of conditions some people have to live in - those 'toilets'! I can't imagine what it must be like for young girls on their periods. You wouldn't get any girls in the UK excited about sanitary towels, that's for sure!

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    1. I think SA has the biggest divide between rich and poor, girls drop out of school when they get their periods sadly

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  7. Hi Suzanne, you do selfless work in South Africa and you must see some really shocking situations. It's all too easy for us to sit in our comfortable homes giving bearly a thought to what really matters to some. To think that sanitary products can cause excitment in this day and age shows how hard life is for many. Keep up the good work.

    Thank you for sharing with #keepingitreal.

    xx

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    Replies
    1. it was amazing how many children got excited about the face cloth and the soap rather than the toy

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