Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Women only in Dubai

Whatever your thoughts are about this it really doesn't matter.

If you live or visit Dubai, this is what you get.

I'm happy to sit anywhere on train or a bus.

Don't go thinking this gives you the right to a seat or more space as a woman.

It's just as packed on the trains and buses wherever you stand.



Or in the ladies section


It is well sign posted and for me the only advantage is these carriages stop right at the top of the escalator.





There are fines for men of AED 100 for being in these areas, but more often than not it's usually Emirate men travelling with their wife and children. Both wearing traditional clothing. The rules aren't enforced that much to be honest, but if a transport inspector does politely remind you that you are in a women's only area, one just moves along nicely, the same goes with eating and drinking on public transport, people do it, until they are asked not to.

There are separate areas at the local doctors although often ignored by husband and wife who really don't want to sit on separate sides of the waiting room for antenatal checks.


I have no desire to go into this park and neither does hubby and besides it's a very small park and there's much more on offer in the big park that the small park is in. We don't have kids living with us anyway.


So it's not a bad thing, there are very few benefits either other than when you are on the public transport and it is packed, fit to bursting, there are no surprises as to exactly what that may be that is rubbing up against you.

*edit
As a woman I have the choice of using the Women's Only section, it is NOT compulsory for me to have to stand or sit there.

26 comments:

  1. Friends who work in Dubai have talked about this. It's how they do things and it's much easier to just go with their flow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't have an issue with it, although i'm more like to get a seat in the other carriages as there are more of them

      Delete
  2. How interesting. And I guess you are just used to this now Suzanne. I think I'd be terrified of standing in the wrong place. Fascinating #tweensteensbeyond

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. as a woman you can stand where you want, so it's quite good really

      Delete
  3. Very interesting. Wow. Thanks for sharing. #TriumphantTales

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm finding your view of Dubai from an insiders point of view fascinating. It's somewhere that I've heard such conflicting stories about - but generally from tourists who are only there briefly #tweensteensbeyond

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there is a huge difference to visiting and living in a foreign country

      Delete
  5. Your posts on life in Dubai are fascinating. I cannot imagine living in such a segregated world. I know that in our church the Easter Orthodox, they have a separate section on the second floor and below on the main level the men and women are supposed to sit in opposite aisles but lately the lines have become blurred.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it's not compulsory, it is a choice, it doesn't really bother me

      Delete
  6. I have been to Dubai as a visitor (only for 5 days!) and I love hearing from you about what it is like to live there. It seems that these restrictions don't impact a great deal on your life Suzanne - thanks for sharing with us at #TweensTeensBeyond

    ReplyDelete
  7. It has been a few years since I was in Dubai but the segregation did blow my mind - so odd and archaic x Sim #PoCoLo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. it isn't compulsory, it's a choice

      Delete
  8. This is so interesting. I did not know that women only areas was a thing. #PoCoLo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. but they're not compulsory, it's a choice

      Delete
  9. Fascinating - what is there reasoning behind this? Can you imagine if they did this in the UK? There would be uproar! 😃 Thank you for sharing this with #TriumphantTales, I hope you can join me again on Tuesday :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i guess there would be the same response if it was introduced a new, but it's always been like this here

      Delete
  10. Suzanne I never realised this was a thing in Dubai. I can see the benefits and actually based on some nightmare tube stories from London I would welcome it actually here. Thanks for linking. #TweensTeensBeyond

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there are definite benefits from it, it doesn't guarantee you a seat, but personal safety and how people feel here is paramount to everyone

      Delete
  11. It's interesting to get an insight into how things are in different countries. #TriumphantTales

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thank you, there are so many things I just accept and don't really take time to appreciate

      Delete
  12. Not having segregated areas in the UK is just something that we take for granted and assume everyone else does the same, so it's interesting to hear how things are elsewhere. Thanks for sharing with #PoCoLo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can remember segregated areas in the UK as a child, especially on public transport for mothers and children

      Delete
  13. Interesting... It is fascinating how other countries work. :)
    Thanks for linking to #pocolo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there are so many things here, i'd love to see implemented in the UK

      Delete

ShareThis